How can I supplement my learning?

I’m just over 20% done with the data analyst path and I feel like there is so much I don’t understand in terms of the logic behind some of the coding. I keep plowing ahead hoping that it will click at some point but are there any tools or resources I can find to help fill in some of the gaps? I don’t have much programming background outside of this and some SQL that I picked up at my previous job so I’m really just beginning this journey. I also am part of one of the scholarship programs that DQ offered recently so I have the premium membership already. Are there any books or online resources I can find? Is there something that DQ offers that I’ve overlooked? I am determined to master this!

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What I have found is that it’s a combination of using this community, other communities, and simple google searches help me when I have issues. Try and figure out exactly what your missing and not understanding first, then reach out. For example, during the second course of step 1 of the Data Scientist path I got really confused on ‘self’ in OOP in Python. A quick google search like ‘understanding self in python’ got me a nice supplement to the course material on ‘self’.

I hope this helps!! Below I have listed my current selection of communities/sources that I find helpful so far. Hope some of them helps you!

https://www.reddit.com/r/datascience/





http://www.dssgfellowship.org//blog/


https://news.ycombinator.com/

Have a great day!!

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I suggest going through kaggle courses in order and try out some of the competitions there.
Besides you can look through https://www.kaggle.com/python10pm/pandas-100-tricks for pandas and https://www.kaggle.com/python10pm/learn-numpy-the-hard-way-70-exercises-solutions for numpy. Besides this the programming logic will come after you practice a lot.
For Basic python you could use realpython website

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I definitely understand that feeling! While I get a lot out of DQ, I have looked into other explanations of things. Lately, I have been worrying over my lack of understanding on data structures. I decided maybe I should search out a free course to beef up my knowledge. Before doing that, I looked through all the steps in the Data Science path on DQ and saw there is actually a mission on data structures, I just haven’t gotten to that step. So, while supplementing your learning with other sources, also take a peek at what’s ahead of you and see if any mission titles ring a bell of “I know I wanted to understand more of this.” :slight_smile: Happy Learning!

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I can definitely relate! my approach is seeking out a number of different explanations/resources and practicing until it clicks.

In terms of Python, I found super useful Jose Portilla’s Python bootcamp on udemy:


(he also has one specifically for data science about pandas/numpy/matplotlib, but I haven’t checked it out yet)

For Python (in general) and Pandas, I like to watch videos on YouTube on specific topics. There are some great content creators on there that are easy to understand and comprehensive:

As a side note, I’d definitely recommend to not just stick with the DQ environment, but to try out the things you learn in your own Jupyter environment. Even better if you also include the command line (Terminal on Mac) in your practice: it can (most likely) seem daunting at first, but it will force you to learn how to seek for solutions on the internet, and it will eventually bring everything together.

Hope this helps!

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Ah, good to hear a direct positive mention of that Portilla Udemy course. I took his SQL course for a little more on SQL than what’s on DQ and I really liked his teaching style, although I felt the majority of it I was primed for on DQ already, so it was not horribly challenging. I am actually interested in expanding my Python learning into some more developer based learning and trying to evaluate my options for that as well. I’ll look into the youtube links you posted, I’ve heard of Corey Schafer before but never looked into his videos.

R/learnpython is a good source too, I should’ve mentioned that in my comment above. Of course, you can fall into a rabbit hole of discussions that are completely outside your knowledge which can be a wild ride but it is also inspiring to see new things and note some to look into for personal learning as well.

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I really believe in following multiple sources to study one same subject. I do it not because I am always looking for the best one but because having multiple perspectives helps me learn better.

To add to @burnsdillion’s list above, here are some of the sources that I use:

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These are great!! I’m gonna add them to my list :smiley: @nityesh

Hey Ashleyn, I was asking how you got the DQ scholarship??
Am Trio btw

I think I received an email notification about it and went through the motions to apply. they might have a blog post about it if you type Scholarship in the DQ blog search bar? I’m sorry I couldn’t be more helpful

Thanks and your very helpful for the reply, can you help me with some code problems am having,if you don’t mind

Hi - I am also part of the scholarship! I have found that watching YouTube videos has helped me a lot (obviously quality varies). I love DataQuest, but I think that because it is based on reading text, sometime I need to supplement the reading with something else to retain the information. I just finished an in-person coding bootcamp, and they had some good suggestions for resources. I don’t see that anyone has recommended this yet for SQL queries. It’s called “SQLZoo”:
-https://sqlzoo.net/